Thoughts on being non-Cuban and spreading the word on the struggle for freedom in Cuba

I originally wasn't going to post anything. But what someone said to me a couple nights ago has weighed heavily on my mind. A group of people and I were talking about the Marlins manager and the uproar over him making comments praising dictator Fidel Castro. Then one of them said to me: "You care more about Cuba than your own heritage" and also "You act like a Cuban". This took me back. And it has made me question a lot of things within myself. First and foremost, I'm not Cuban. And I don't pretend to be. as far as "acting like a Cuban", what does a Cuban act like? Really. I know many Cubans. And all of them are different. They are their own personalities just like everyone else. I did not ask that question to the person but the only explanation I can come up with as to why they said that, is because I am a very emotional and passionate person (that's probably an understatement there) and I guess that is one of the stereotypes that society has given Cubans. As for "caring about Cuba more than my own heritage", this was the statement that offended me the most. I was speechless to that. Anyone that knows me knows that my heritage is who I am. And I am equally as passionate about my Irish and Scottish heritage as I am about Cuba. My ancestors were opressed for centuries. They were raped, murdered, starved, beaten, and eventually forced out of their homeland and came to the United States. The type of oppression they were under is different than what is going on in Cuba. Ireland was oppressed by a monarchy. Cuba is oppressed by a Communist Dictatorship. But I feel in my heart and soul for Cuba. I think about Cuba and her wonderful and brave people every single damn day. And I also think about my own heritage everyday. I love Cuba. Her people. Her music. Cubans have a passion for everything. For family. For life. You don't see that in many cultures now. American culture has abandoned the family unit. We have abandoned a passion for freedom and life. We could learn a lot from Cubans in exile and from Cubans still on the island. They don't take their freedom her for granted. They live with purpose. Everything they do, they put their all into. They remind me of the Irish. I think these two cultures have more in common than people realize. But being non-Cuban and trying to find people who care about Cuba and her struggle, is extremely hard. I have tried to tell people about Cuba, to which one responded flat out, "I don't care". But then there are those who genuinely do care and do listen. But they are few. But I still keep talking about Cuba. Why? Because that is the main way we can help Cuba be free. To spread the truth about the Castros and make people realize what is happening there. The more people that know the truth, the more power the dissidents have, and the more closer Cuba will be to becoming free. So, to the person who said those words to me and who made me think deeply about this: thank you. Thank you for making me realize how much I love my Irishness and how much I love Cuba. And if I "act like a Cuban", then fine. At the end of the day, instead of playing video games and rotting my brain on things that do no good for me, I can say that I tried to help people become free, in whatever small way I can. Cuba will be free, one day. To all of my non-Cuban friends, please consider speaking out for those in Cuba who live everyday in oppression. We can use our freedom to help them gain theirs. They deserve freedom. They have suffered far too long. May God bless all of them. And peace be with you all. VIVA CUBA LIBREEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Comments

  1. Wow - my feelings exactly - www.mojitonovel.com

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  2. Cuba and Ireland have much in common, I agree. Both countries’ histories intertwine. For the person who made you think of all this Colena, yes, thank you and thank you for this post, for helping with folk’s awareness.

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